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Dog-Friendly Hotels in Ireland for Your Staycation

Dog-Friendly Hotels in Ireland for Your Staycation

Many dog owners are uncomfortable leaving their dogs behind, and now a growing number of dog-friendly Irish hotels are offering a real céad míle fáilte for Fido!  

While most dogs enjoy most well-run kennels, some do become anxious boarding. Pet sitters are another option, but again, it doesn’t suit everyone. And many of us just feel that holidays are more fun with our best friends. We think it’s the perfect time of year for a few extra treats, too.... 

If you’re looking for a dog-friendly hotel in Ireland, here are just some of the great options available. Most dog-friendly hotels in Ireland don’t let dogs in public areas of the facilities such as restaurants, bars, lobbies, and gyms. Many have a one-pet limit, a few have size limits for your dog, and some charge a deposit or a pet fee. When booking, please be sure to confirm all details regarding your pet, related charges and rules.  

Our advice? Pack a Kong toy or twenty to make sure your pup has plenty to get their teeth into whiel you’re basking in the lap of luxury! 

Dog-Friendly Hotels for City Breaks 

  • The Hilton, Kilmainham, Dublin City – This hotel is convenient to the city’s most popular spots such as Kilmainham Gaol, The Guinness Storehouse, The Irish Museum of Modern Art and across the River Liffey from the Phoenix Park, Dublin Zoo and the Irish National Museum of Decorative Arts & History at Collins Barracks. Small and medium dogs are permitted at the Hilton for an extra fee, but large breeds are not allowed. Contact them directly for details. 
  • Castletroy Park Hotel, Limerick City – Boasting a dog-friendly courtyard, the Castletroy Park Hotel is near the university. Explore King John’s Castle and Lough Derg, stroll around Ireland’s most underrated city. You can even take a dog-friendly cruise with Killaloe River Cruises. You’ll need to confirm your dog is within their size limits and bring your own dog bed, bowls and food. 

Town & Country: Best of Both Words 

  • The Twelve Hotel, Barna Village, Co. Galway – Can’t decide if you want a city break or a retreat in the countryside? The Twelve Hotel is just outside of Galway City and close to Connemara. They pride themselves on pampering your pet with a doggy welcome bag. You and your dog can enjoy the beach, the countryside and the city here. 
  • The Salty Dog, Bangor, Co. Down – Your dog won’t be feeling salty at all when they see the sweet welcome they get here. Pet-friendly since they first opened, The Salty Dog allows dogs of all sizes and multiple dogs up to two large/ medium dogs or three small ones. On Belfast’s doorstep, the location allows you to enjoy all the city offers – including the Titanic Museum – and explore Strangford Lough and the Ards Penninsula. 

 

Getting Away from It All with Your Dog 

  • Rathmullen House, Rathmullen, Co. Donegal – If you and your dog love exploring the outdoors together, this Georgian gem could be perfect.  On the shores of Lough Swilly, Rathmullen House offers seven acres of wooded gardens. Their pet-friendly accommodation has a separate entrance and includes a dog bed, bowls and clean up bags. Your dog can even feast on table scraps from the hotel kitchen.  
  • Dunloe Hotel & Gardens, Killarney, County Kerry – With 64 acres and an enclosed dog run, this sounds great for active dogs. Active people will appreciate the onsite activities including tennis, swimming, horse riding and fishing.  Dunloe Hotel and Gardens also provide a doggy welcome bag, pet bed, food and water bowls and even a throw for the couch for dogs accustomed to lounging in luxury.  

Remember, you should always inform the hotel of your pet when booking and ask for current details of their pet policy. Generally reservations should be made by phone to ensure you are getting a pet-friendly room.  

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